Armstrong among OSU scholarship recipients

Graduate student receives honor named for 2001 plane crash victims

Daily Light report
Cassidy Armstrong

STILLWATER, Okla. — Cassidy Armstrong of Waxahachie is among a number of Oklahoma State University graduate students to receive a scholarship that honors 10 OSU students and staff killed in a plane crash in Colorado.

A little over a decade after the horrible events of Jan. 27, 2001, a scholarship program was created in memoriam of the 10 lives lost: Kendall Durfey, Bjorn Fahlstrom, Nathan Fleming, Will Hancock, Daniel Lawson, Jr., Brian Luinstra, Denver Mills, Pat Noyes, Bill Tietgens and Jared Weiberg.

Created in 2012, the scholarship program supports graduate students seeking a master’s degree or doctorate at OSU in mental health counseling, clinical psychology, counseling psychology, school psychology or marriage and family therapy. Each recipient receives a $1,000 cash scholarship.

The scholarship focuses on degrees that provide support in grief and bereavement.

For more information on the scholarship or how to donate, visit remembertheten.com.

The Remember the Ten Run – which is celebrating 15 years – usually takes place in April, but was postponed to Aug. 28 this year because of the pandemic.

Armstrong received a bachelor’s degree from OSU in 2020. She is a first-year doctoral student in the clinical psychology Ph.D. program specializing in American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) health psychology under the mentorship of Dr. Ashley B. Cole. She is interested in research investigating AI/AN health behaviors and health disparities, specifically examining variables such as trauma, substance use and other mental health outcomes.

Armstrong’s future ambitions are to conduct clinical work and research at an integrated health care facility to help individuals dealing with trauma and related health concerns. Further, she aims to serve as a mentor to young researchers from marginalized groups to help promote future generations of clinical scientists from underrepresented backgrounds. 

“It is with great humility and enthusiasm that I accept the Remember Ten Run Scholarship,” Armstrong said. “This is an incredibly prestigious honor that will support me in reaching my goals of earning a degree in higher education, which will allow me to establish a successful career as a clinical health psychologist. Further, this scholarship supports me to not only develop the necessary clinical skills to treat individuals who are dealing with trauma and various other health concerns, but also supports the research to examine the relationships among trauma and related mental and physical health outcomes. 

“It is an honor and a privilege to receive a scholarship that honors the legacy and memory of 10 members of our Oklahoma State family and promotes the urgent need for mental health services through support for the education of current graduate students pursuing careers in mental health.”