I once again could not disagree more with Thiessen's take on Donald Trump and his words and behaviors. The evidence of what Trump said in the speech is available for anyone to read online. Thiessen cherry-picked a few quotes rather than examining the more inflammatory rhetoric.


Trump stated in this address that "this left-wing cultural revolution is designed to overthrow the American Revolution." He went on to say that "they are determined to tear down every statue, symbol, and memory of our national heritage." Trump further stated, "against every law of society and nature, our children are taught in school to hate their own country, and to believe that the men and women who built it were not heroes, but were villains."


This is some, but not all, of the content of this address. I conclude it was not the media that distorted, but Trump.


Every movement consists of outliers, but in general, the point at least some of the protesters is making is there are some persons immortalized in our country that apparently did not believe in our core value that all men are created equal. They are calling upon us all to have an awakening about the forces that perpetuate inequality in our country. Should we not at least have discussions about these issues? Theissen and I do agree on that point.


Despite all of that, in my opinion, Trump personally does not care one way or the other about history, national values, or statuary. I think his attention to the issue is to serve two particular purposes: to rile up his base and to change the subject. With the abysmal failure of his administration to rein in COVID-19 and the revelation that he ignored intelligence that Russia was offering bounties to kill American soldiers, he wanted to put the focus elsewhere.


Linda Johnston Arage/Waxahachie