The Midlothian FFA’s second annual Chapter Progress Show, “Tune Up 2011,” and Friends of Midlothian FFA fundraiser benefitting scholarship, banquet and EXPO sale, is scheduled for Saturday, Feb. 26, at the MISD Animal Science Complex located at 1851 Mockingbird. The event starts at 9 a.m.

“Many times, parents consider FFA livestock projects a failure if their son or daughter does not win at the show. We need to understand all the benefits our students gain from raising and showing livestock,” said Dennis Mann, ag teacher. “Ideally, FFA project animals should be a family affair. If time and energy are spent by the students and parents together, these projects will help our kids learn basic life skills that will eventually help them develop into better citizens.”

The event will feature a showmanship show with more than 150 Midlothian FFA and Jr. FFA students participating. Awards will be presented for all champion livestock. There are no entry fees. All livestock weight cards must be turned in by 8 a.m. Lambs, goats and pigs have a 5-pound weigh back.

“Keeping livestock shows in proper perspective is important. They are not cow shows, swine shows or goat shows, they are ‘Kid Shows.’ The animal is simply the ticket for the youngster to participate,” Mann said.

The fundraiser will include a cake and pie auction plus big ticket auction items featuring two sports packages, each including 12 tickets with suite seating and three parking passes for an upcoming Dallas Mavericks game and a Dallas Stars game, donated by Shawn Byrum of Byrum Ranch.

The Friends of Midlothian FFA raffle will offer a Remington 700 270 rifle with Leupold 3-9-50 Vx, a Remington 11-87 Super Mag 12 Ga semi-automatic shotgun and a $100 Academy gift card. Raffle tickets cost $1 and may be purchased at the event by individuals 18 and older. Ticket holders need not be present to win.

The event is free and open to the public. Breakfast and lunch will be available. For information, e-mail eric_jaszen@midlothian-isd.net or dennis_mann@midlothian-isd.net.

“Very few FFA livestock projects are economically profitable. However, neither are paying for band lessons, taking them to summer recreation programs, buying them bicycles and paying for other youth activities,” Mann said. “But if a parent’s goal is to invest in their child’s develop as a person, learn responsibility, set goals and gain knowledge of livestock production, then FFA livestock projects are profitable investments in their child’s future.”

Contact Rebecca at rebecca.hertz@wninews.com or call 469-517-1451.